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important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in the south, we will enhance three established hubs of educational excellence in north, south, and central new jersey. and we will bring rutgers, and new jersey medical education, into the 21st century. i thank you for passing this plan, and i was proud to sign it into law this summer. in k-12 education, we have made great strides, but there is much more to be done. who would have thought, just three years ago, in the face of entrenched resistance, that i could stand here and congratulate us today for the following -- ensuring accountability by passing the first major reform of tenure in 100 years, establishing performance-based pay in newark through hard-nosed collective bargaining so that we can reward and retain the very best teachers where we need them most, implementing inter-district school choice, which has tripled its enrollment in the last 3 years and will grow to 6,000 students next year, growing the number of charter scho
in answering it. >> what do you say to the secularist? >> i say let's engage on the science. let me hear what your arguments are and then let's respond to them. and i would ask in turn that you listen to what the scientific community has to say. it's perfectly fine to have a great conversation with many people about the science itself because the science is so robust at this point. i mean, we have basically known for over 20 years now that, and it actually boils down, for all the complexity of the science it's really quite simple. it's real, okay, climate change is real. it is mostly human caused this time. there have been climate changes over many millions of years in the past that had nothing to do with human beings. this time it's mostly being caused by our activities. third, it's going to be bad. in fact, it's bad now and it's going to get worse. fourth, there's hope, that there are lots of solutions already on the table that are in fact already being implemented in this country, communities all across this country as well as around the world. there's an enormous amount of work that we ca
don't want to be the person that denies it. there's too much science. there was a moment in the early 90s and that was when i had my first kid. i mean, this is really selfish, you know. i had my first kid and i thought, oh, my gosh. i started learning about what was really going on. they talked about greenhouse. remember, the time magazine said, "what is the greenhouse effect?" there was a moment where we were all really motivated and then i don't know what happened. personally, i think the oil companies and i think that a lot of people whose pockets are lined by them just devastated that conversation. tavis: what do you think it is gonna take for that conversation to get traction with everyday american people? i say the average american because it is not like these issues aren't discussed. it is not like people, you know, can't feel that something in the environment -- whether you understand global warming or climate change or not, it is pretty hard to deny that the weather patterns are changing. i mean, your regular joe can tell that something is happening. >> oh, yeah. ranchers are
to go to on the far side of the unknown that can do the robotic science, can do the mining for the ice crystals and convert that into hydrogen and oxygen, which is fuel. a conference recently in hawaii, i was following a workshop that has been setting up international lunar bases by practicing on the big island of hawaii. you will assemble a large number of large objects. you put the first one down or you expected to land, another one down some distance away -- how do you put them together? do that through a satellite -- motion control. you prove that you can do something like that here in the united states. then we do it at the moon. why my so enthusiastic about that? that is exactly what we want to do at mars. we want to put people on the noon of mars who can then assemble a base that we will then send people. we should assure ourselves that we protect crew members from radiation as much as possible before they ever go somewhere. that is the moon, too. >> a two-part question -- do you believe in extraterrestrial life? >> i hope so. >> are we presumptuous enough to think we are the on
is low. daphne koller, a computer science professor at stanford, is one of coursera's founders. >> i think by opening up education for free to everyone around the world, they're going to turn education, high-quality education, from a privilege to a basic human right, so that anyone, no matter their social, economic or family circumstances, has access to the best education. >> reporter: those lofty goals-- the experience of teaching thousands of students and the possibility of future profits-- are what got these courses going. professors from top universities are signing up, even though they are not paid by the providers. eventually, universities may share revenues they receive-- when there are revenues-- with the professors. and those star professors have inspired intense student interest in the courses, says coursera's other co-founder, andrew ng. >> most people today will never have access to a princeton, stanford, cal tech class. but now, if you wake up tomorrow morning and you decide you want to take a cal tech class, you can. you can just sign up for one, and it's free. >> repor
award. during school time i like learning math and science, because my teacher uses chinese to explain. if the teachers didn't teach my cousins and my sisters and me how to speak chinese, we wouldn't be able to speak in restaurants. once again, thank you. [applause] [speaking foreign language] >> good evening, everyone, i am winnie chi, i am the body president of alice fong yu, this is like a second home to me. the teachers and my friends support me and they make me feel special. and also staff members and teachers guarantee that we have a safe environment to learn. and they make us feel comfortable and safe to share our feelings. i enjoy math and science, because the teachers teach us in chinese. and they teach us step by step. i am proud to be a student at alice fong yu. thank you. [speaking foreign language] [applause] >> hello, everyone, i am maze. i a seventh grader at alice fong yu, and i am peer mediator. afy is an amazing school. the chinese i learned there has been helpful in so many situations. if not for me being able to speak chinese, i would not be able to communicate with
's not on the rise and neither is cyber bullying and the top scholars in the country and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general cam
the political science community telling us if you look at where obama's approval ratings, these were not carter or bush sr. numbers, there was growth there. they were saying all year this guy should be a slight favorite to win reelection and low and behold after the drama he ends up winning by five million votes. do you think we appreciate it that obama was in pretty good shape? >> not great, but decent. >> it was like a chia pet election. you water it and it kept growing and growing. a lot of this has to do with the fact that the campaign knows how to do this campaign thing. they were able to expand and maximize what they had on the ground. you can't substitute. there is no substitute in this day and age for the target of the voters and reaches the audience and brings them out. nobody has done it better. not even in 2008. >> as we watch, thank you for joining us. president obama will take the oath of office in 12 days and preparations are under way in washington. the stage is being construct and we just learned that beyonce, kelly clark son and james taylor will perform. beyonce will belt out
with venture capital money, offering classes in science, technology, engineering, and math. universities came on board, hoping to reach more students than they previously could, and to improve instruction both on and off campus using online technology. thrun says early results are promising. >> we have some data on how work for some of the classes, we've shown that the average point score of students taking those classes online is higher, significantly higher than taking it in the classroom. that's kind of mind-blowing. >> reporter: he says teachers are learning new strategies that are more effective than the traditional lecture. >> it's not my lecturing that changes the student, but it's the student exercise. so our courses feel very much like video games, where you're being bombarded with exercise after exercise. that's very different from the way i teach at stanford, where i'm much more in a lecturing mode. >> porter: at coursera, says online courses aren't dominated by a few aggressive students in a classroom. >> on the online web site, we have these things we call in- video quizzes, wher
than it appears, it's not rocket science? >> and not only maybe not rocket science but ends up being good. in texas, 6% unemployment and that is attributed to the energy boom. they allowed it to happen. on the federal level we are not allowing it to take place. in iowa they have a surplus and the fours they have an unemployment rate. so you can make people's lives better. it makes sense to people in a common sense level but in the federal area not so much. >> neil: i get a lot of e-mail. we had ron johnson on and got heated on and where is your backbone in spending cuts. you have folks saying, you have to realize elections have consequences. the president won. this to say beyond justifying tax hikes, it justified no spending cuts. i don't think that is the americanss saw it. they won't see the math here that hurts democrats and republicans alike if something isn't done? >> here is the question i think the president knows well that this is the question. is california the model we're going to follow? they are $165 billion to $335 billion in debt. they say they might have a surplus beca
equal more killing," science reporter elizabeth rosen hal refused the notion that armed security reduces gun violence. the research? she went to latin america and saw unsafe places had guards in restaurants and stuff. she concludes guards with guns mean more murder. this is a science reporter. as recent magazine notes like explaining the birds and bees to a teen, armed guards might be a response to high homicide rates rather than a cause of them. anyway, we have been here before. relativism which views good and bad behavior is relative, poisons all debate. using rosenthal's office we should disarm the military. clearly their guns lead to more war, i think. this is sometimes reporting. in the times, it makes me wish i were a liberal. then all i say is "x" is bad because "x" is bad. fracking, bad. got no evidence but it has to be bad. spending cuts, that kills grannies, you granny-killer. industry, they use smokestacks, i must do something to stop that. bain capital, even if i don't know what it is. tea party, racist, i have no evidence but c'mon, just look at them. benghazi, more deaths.
you on your performance and the fact that science magazine named you number one biopharmaceutical employer in the world. >> we are lucky. my partner since we opened the labs nearly 25 years ago, actually we started the company. today is our birthday. 25 years ago today we actually signed the first papers that started regeneron. but when we opened the labs in 1989, george my partner, we believed that the key to the business was to do good science and focus on patients and then get individual scientists and treat them well and let them run and they would get across the finish line like they have. >> i thought the sales were amazing. people expected even more. did they expect more because one of your competitors was caught up in a pharmacy compounding problem? is that what people expected because of the problem with your competitor? >> yeah, it is hard to know what drives it and what people exactly expect and why they expect it. but there was a problem with compounding pharmacies. people had fungal meningitis and died from injections of drugs. but that put a question mark around a lo
, celeste ward gventer, thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
, celeste ward gventer thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
engineers to hire. britain's universities lead the world in teaching science and engineering and yet we have an annual shortfall of 60,000 graduates and nine of ten post graduate students in those subjects are from overseas. what more can we do? >> my hon. friend is entirely right and we need to tackle this problem at every level, making sure we are teaching math and science and stem subject probably and there are signs the number of people taking those subjects are increasing. we need to make sure our universities are properly funded and make sure that is the case but we also need to raise the profile about engineering and that is one of the reasons we introduced the 1 million pound prize, for engineering. that combined with 34 university technologies will make sure we train engineers we need for the future. >> it is more important than ever in northern ireland that we continue moving forward away from violence and create stability and i am sure the prime minister will agree to me that food participation and support for the political and democratic process by everybody so people's issues ca
about this law, because critics say it damages our ability to truly know, using serious science, the impact that guns have on public health and public safety, impeding research on gun safety, and preventing doctors from talking to patients about the potential health risks that come with gun ownership. add advocates who support the law say it protects the rights of gun owners. the national rifle association somehow managed to put this stealth legislation into president obama's health care reform bill. the question is how and why. and why, whatever you think of a law, one of the president's top allies, that's right, the president's ally, helped the nra get it passed. no surprise that there's a big dose of politics involved here. jim acosta tonight is keeping 'em honest. >> when president obama signed national health care reform into law, few in washington knew that buried in the legislation's more than 900 pages was a gift to the nation's powerful gun lobby. but here it is. a provision entitled "protection of second amendment rights." it states the government and health insurers c
fill with mud and a very sophisticated science you can reconstruct environmental histories going back in time. this is the 1920s and 1800's and look at past pollution levels preserved in the archive like a history book in the bottom of a lake. >> say that pollution levels right now are low, but you think they're going to go up over time but it strikes me even in the example you were just talking about and in saying they're low you're comparing them to a pristine environment that was the wilderness but the level you're finding are lower than what we would find in most cities. >> right now, well these are wilderness lakes we should say. these lakes are anywhere from 30 kilometers or sorry, 60 miles to 60 miles away from the major source. you have to fly into the lakes typically with a helicopter or something. they're not right no the oil sand operation. what is i think important to say, if you look at our most polluted site, which is about 15 miles let's say approximately from the major operation, if you look at that, that current levels would find in a city. what is different in many c
the internet. immigration is a big deal. getting the kids in school today studying the sciences and technology and engineering and the math to stay in this country and getting a path to his citizenship and dealing with the competencies' to grow jobs. if you can deal with those issues, we would be off to a great start. >> you have many of your clients in the manufacturing business. looking at the broader economic shift, what do you do in a post- manufacturing world to provide the numbers of jobs that america needs? because it does not appear clear yet. >> we have roughly 12 million jobs through the great recession lost. we have filled about half of those. it will still take some more between five-seven years to get unemployment down to the 5% range. and you are right, the skill sets are starting to move. it will have to be able to move with that prepared the first that -- we will have to be able to move with that. the first up is immigration reform and job training. >> you are a guide in ohio and you have lost your job at a car plant and you are 55 years old. immigration reform will not help yo
line that is -- has filled, science fiction novels. there's more to the script. there are 17 billion planets similar to earth in our galaxy. could the similarities mean that any of those could support life? a short time ago i discussed that with theoretical physicist michio kaku. >> this is a game changer. one out of six stars that you see a night could have an earth- like planet going around it. somebody could be looking back at us from our space. >> what are the chances that they are? some of these planets circulating might have the possibility of supporting life? >> to be fair, most of the earth-size planets probably have no more than microbial life like germs and seaweed. a few of them might have intelligent life. dna has been around for about $3.50 -- 3.5 billion years. only in the last five runners thousand years as intelligent life risen out of this one. you cannot rule out intelligent life. quex in 2011, astronomers said they had found two earth sized planets. now it is billions. >> they have taken a census of the milky way galaxy. 50% of all stars have some kind of planet go
the museum and the california academy of sciences, shakespeares garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring blossom association. flowers and plants played an important part in shakespeares literary masterpieces. here is an enchanting and tranquil garden tucked away along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. appreciate the beauty of its unique setting. the cherry tree, the brick walkways, the enchanting stones, the rustic sundial. chaired the bards'w ro -- share the bard's words. the garden is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, enjoy the sunshine and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare float you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. shakespeares garden is 8ada accessible. this park is located at the bottom of a hill. it is a secret garden with an infinite and captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, one block from the bottom of lombard street, it makes the top of our list for the most intimate picnic settings. avoid all tourist cars an
, but -- galileo academy of science and technology. we are so very proud of you today. wherever you go, let the young people know from -- to city hall, that you have arrived today. let them know where you went to school today so they can have hope. my younger sisters, cohen, kim, you're always there. where's the opera house? we thank you. hbcu. that makes my heart happy. this commissioners would not be sitting here today, former commissioner mar, former commissioner jane kim, now supervisor. former commissioner norman yee. no supervisor. you give our people hope. i will say that malia cohen, would be the next president of the board of supervisors. supervisor kennedy and doris ward, they showed you what to do. good luck and god bless each of you. >> my name is michael -- i want to say welcome to the class of 2013. congratulations for making yourself available and here at city hall. second, i want to point out that two of the nominees need to have a legislative aide if they will be board president, if malia cohen and jane jim would need a third legislative aide. second, all three of the c
by >> stephen: tonight, science finds the key to a long, healthy life. whatever it is, i bet it tastes good fried. [ laughter ] then, controversy over the new bin laden film. they shouldn't have let him do his own singing. [ laughter ] and my guest, chris kluwe, is an nfl punter and gay rights advocate. wow, pretty brave for an nfl player to admit he's a punter. [ laughter ] jimmy kimmel starts in his new 11:35 time slot tonight. but since he's my direct competition, i refuse to mention him. this is "the colbert report." captioning sponsored by comedy central ["the colbert report" theme music playing] [cheers and applause] thank you, ladies and gentlemen. welcome to the report. [crowd chanting see stephen] [cheers and applause] thank you, ladies and gentlemen. [cheers and applause] welcome to the report, folks. i have to thank you for that and i want to thank you for joining me in here, out there nation, we all know the economy's not in great shape. just today the dow dropped fifty five-- of whatever it is. [ laughter ] dow-lers. [ laughter ] so i was glad to hear that one of my investments
. that i have the genetic front loading for alcoholism. we know today from the science that a kid who has the genetic front loading for addiction and suffers trauma in their add less dense is 50% more likely to develop adickive disease later in life and co occurring mental illness. this i wasn't responsible for that, ok? we need to get serious about both gun control and treating mental illness in this country. >> cenk: republicans don't want to treat mental illness. they just want to register people so they can put them on a list somewhere. >> that's crazy. that's crazy. >> cenk: you know, then that leads to the question based on what you're saying if mental health is connected oh addiction, do they want a list for addicts, as well and what are they going to do with that list? >> i don't know, but the truth is this is insanity. i mean, we are the richest country on the planet. we, you know, we have an obligation to begin, you know, for every dollar that goes to the national institute of health only 10 cents negotiation to the national institute of mental health. we are now beginning to re
finance minister of climate change science. financeok our former scienc minister around the world read only for started, he said humans were not responsible and was opposed to any action on climate change. we traveled for four weeks. i took into the u.s., the u.k. by the end, i got him to a point where he said, "climate change is happening and humans have probably cost part of it." i was able to convince him somewhat of the need to switch to renewable energy. we need to make these transitions right away toward wind and solar, clean energy, because if we don't, we are going to see more and more of these devastating extreme weather events that occurred not just australia, the people all around the world. >> anna rose, how sycophant is the position of the u.s. on climate change >> -- how significant is the position of u.s. on climate change? >> it is extremely significant countries like the street and around the world. the rest of the world has started to act around the world. the europe has been doing it for those big stepsad will not happen until we get the united states to put a price
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about where we focus on reporting from the front lines. the only known person that has been held in connection with the attack on the american consulate in libya has been released by a judge in tunisia. the news agency in tunisia reports he was questioned as a witness, not a suspect, but an american federal law enforcement official tells susan candiotti the freed man remains a suspect. the official says investigators have identified 15 other individuals that he believes will eventually be indicted. cnn contributor tom fuentes says bringing any suspects to justice will be very difficult because of the chaos in the aftermath of the attack. he says the fbi also lacks a strong investigative partner in libya. >>> for the second day in a row the same airline, the same boston airport, is having a problem with boeing's dream liner. this is japan airlines. there was a flight carrying 181 people. it was
has been to china many times knows his markets and political science has told us china was way too restrictive in the monetary policy, that somehow the communist party got caught up on worrying about inflation, not worrying about growth. come on, malice, be like mal for heaven sake. i think they're still going with the techs, though. that's over. klaus is confident that when the dpovt unveils the plan for growth in february, they're going to dazzle, from a disappointing 8% to a stunning 11%. there's plenty to like if china gets ho the t in here and takin all its clothes, that's ray lewis. the chinese are addicted to coal. and we know electric uses have gotten stronger and stronger as the year's gone on. got that data. although joy's up about 10% in two weeks. you can look at truck manufacturers as the chinese are back with a vengeance. but i don't know, i don't want to outthink this. the best way to play china is china, specifically the etf for the biggest chinese stocks i've steered you away from owning individual stocks except for brief flirtation with baydu. nevertheless, call m
point plan to rewrite the english math he science test. the test will emphasize critical thinking and problem solving skills called for extensive answers and fill in bubble multiple trace questions now used. the new test will measure the real world skills our students need to be ready for career and for college. his proposal to be approved by the legislature but the first new test would be administered two years from now. >> well here's the sobering fact. sonoma county alone there are 3000 new cancer diagnosis every year. that means 3000 people and the family are struggling with the impact of treatment and life complication they cause. wayne has more about a non-profit group making the healing process a bit easier. >> apple. >> daily task we take for granted. entering a kitchen. making a me. try it some time when recovering from leukemia treatment. >> i could lay in bed and not eat. >>reporter: it was complete staggering change from the life darlene used to have as mechanic for federal express. illness that just came on one day. >> i was just tired. wept home. had a chest
when you spend $50 on hp ink. staples, that was easy. >> welcome back of stories and sciences are tracking a great white shark off the coast of florida. jacksonville police sgt people to stay out of the water. a 16 ft., three 400 lb. great white shark was spotted about 50 mi. off the shore yesterday. a another great white shark was also spotted about 30 mi. off the coast. the sharks were tad last september are researchers in massachusetts. for the two sharks are wearing special gps tracking devices on their door so fence that also researches to see their roofs.routes. >> but it goes out a new york right now. scanner reports indicated the 17 people injured after a boat crashed in manhattan dock spread uc them being taken away and stretchers. about a dozen people have been injured. they're going to the hospital and this is where the accident happened. about 12 people are injured and this happened just about a half hour ago. when we receive more information we will bring ghetto you carry mom >>it to you. >> judgment day has arrived for barry bonds, roger clemens and sammy sosa to
alameda creek filter gallery project, with environmental science associates to provide environmental analysis services and permitting support; and authorize the general manager to execute this amendment with a time extension of six years, for a total agreement of duration of eight years, 10 months. >> [speaker not understood]. good afternoon, commissioners. tm kelly. this project, the alameda creek, per alameda creek filter gallery project is located in [speaker not understood] on alameda creek. it is to recapture water that is released for fisheries, habitat enhancement from the calaveras dam. the project started in january 2010, then it was placed on hold for -- since november 2011, basically two years. and now we are ready, almost ready. the planning has been going on to plan the project and we're almost ready to start environmental review again, but we don't have enough time. so, therefore, we're asking for a three-year, five-month extension. there was a slight error in the agenda item under amendment number 1. if you look at that, it says extension by sick years. >> yes. >> but
on science, this is not an arbitrary deadline, we need to make a decision around that time if we're going to do something other than, other than the base case. i would suggest that, if i might , perhaps the wording of the resolution to address what i think is a very clear issue of trust be something along the lines that if we're not able to achieve option 4, that we return to you on the meeting of february 5th, which would be coincidentally on february 1st to explain where we are. >> i personally would have no objection to that. and just to be clear, is it -- the decision under option 4 need to be made by february or all of the preconditions that we've talked about need to be sewed up? i mean, i realize there can be a point in january where it all looks like it's lining up and you and the agency decide, we're going forward with option 4, subject to some contingencies. and if those go bad, it has the negative impacts you talked about. but i think the concern from the community that we're hearing, and i know you hear this, is that we sort of set a false goal. so, i wonder if february 1st is
soil science to irrigation techniques. and before they knew it, they had developed a thriving avocado orchard along the way. they now have 8,500 avocado trees--trees that have come to mean more to the couple than they ever could have imagined. >> we like to think that we have 8,500 employees working for us here at the facility on our area. and we like to think of every tree as really an individual with its own personality. >> my husband calls them our employees, but they're kind of like my babies, and anytime anything happens to them, you feel horrible. and you see where a tree is stressed, and you have to take care of it. and if any of them die, you feel bad. you feel really bad. so you want to take of them as best you can. >> and those 8,500 employees continue to sork hard for linda and mark, who continue to dote on them. they hope to harvest about 15,000 pounds of fruit per acre this season alone. each avocado is hand picked, making sure the stem is trimmed off so it doesn't scrape or bruise other avocados when it is packed. and then the fruit is driven here to mission produce in n
being accused early on by a science teacher and told i was using lsd and i didn't know what it was at the time. i was in the class for three months and didn't work english and the teacher didn't realize i didn't speak english and there was only 20 in the classroom and bullying can take different shapes and not paying attention and caring and while we're focusing on what kids are doing to each other, we must not ignore that sometimes adults can be part of the problem just by their behavior, even by the way they look the other way. i agree with richard 100% that we need to deal with this but zero tolerance has to be articulated in a very different way. 36% of kids that are bullied everyday report not coming to school. there is another piece that is important. as a member of the justice center we did intensive study of school discipline last year and looked at a million roashds and 60% that are disciplined incredibly more likely to drop out of school and end up in the criminal justice system and while we are working with the victims and educating we are working with all of
to document, we feel like this is the science of it which, you know, sounds a little sterile when you consider the emotional loss, but that you document each incident as it happens so you have a record and you also look at the climate, the culture, and also the perpetrator. we have a second piece of legislation that calls for the restoretive justice element that people were talking about with regard to bullying, not just lgbt kids but in general. there was a sect committee this year of men and boys of color and that committee came out with a number of pieces of legislation all based on alerting to more programs, actually codifying the issue and also consequences and solutions and particularly with an accent on looking on is suspension automatic, is expulsion automatic. cyber bullying, another dimension of all this, the new technology, we're all catching up, there are two, three pieces of legislation that i co-authored, i am not the sponsor, that deals with cyber bullying. i will say the social networking folks have been very cooperative about that. so just, in sum, we have sacramento's intent
to also teach our students, the workforce, that there is a new science -- repair, renewal, and rehabilitation. that's different from building something new. you cannot fix each and every crack in the city. it's like each city, you're talking about 3,000, 5,000 miles of pipe. so you have to prioritize where they can go and fix the system. narrator: each city faces unique situations, so they must determine the asset management approach that best addresses these challenges. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an opt
for second graders and make the switch to the new test. science assessments will be added and the state will consider alternatives to the current high school exit exam. a representative of the san ramon valley unified school district was excited. when was the last time you heard that? >> most of the teachers that i talk to say this is great because it allows us to be creative again. >> reporter: the goal is to phase out rote memorization and develop critical thinking and problem solving skills. eventually all students will take the test on computers and no two tests will be the same. the computer asks questions based on a student's previous answer to pinpoint what they know. >> it's going to enable teachers to pinpoint how they put together their lessons, how thief that individual child. >> reporter: 44 other states have adopted what's called the common core state standard. >> to be able to compare state to state district to district, and more importantly, it's going to be able to allow districts, schools, teachers, parents, students to really underst
with a simple test that women already get routinely. our report tonight from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: the experimental test could revolutionize early detections for two major women's cancers. uterine, which calls 8,000 women a year in this country. and ovian, which kills 15,000. >> this has the potential to fill in a niche where there is no effective screening test. >> reporter: linda da phono has stage 3 ovarian cancer. she had a fullness in her abdomen, a symptom women often ignore. >> i started to feel this strange feeling that i just knew wasn't right. >> reporter: she is undergoing 18 weeks of chemotherapy. doctors have long been searching for a test to find ovarian cancer early, when it is for mar easily treated. >> when ovarian cancer is found at stage 1, the cure rate is 85 to 90%. >> reporter: to develop the new test, the scientists at johns hopkins started with a familiar pap smear that looks for abnormal cells that become cervical cancer. the pap test has saved millions of lives around the world. the hopkins researchers found that cancer i could
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